FSRN Weekly Edition – Sept. 19, 2014

(PhotoCredit: alexkerhead via Flickr Creative Commons)
  • The NOs have it in Scotland’s independence referendum
  • At least 700 migrants and refugees killed in recent Mediterranean shipwrecks
  • Civil rights groups urge congressional action on racial profiling
  • Pennsylvania parents call for buffers zones between fracking facilities and schools
  • Thai media under pressure since May military coup
  • Forty years after Chile coup, families of two U.S. citizens killed in aftermath await answers

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The NOs have it in Scotland’s independence referendum

Voters in Scotland have rejected independence in a referendum closely watched around the world. For more than two years the Scottish National Party had been campaigning to end the 307-year-old union between Scotland and the rest of Britain in what makes up the United Kingdom.

Turnout was at a level not seen since the UK-wide general election in 1950. But that wasn’t enough leading the SNP leader Alex Salmond to concede early Friday morning.

“Scotland has by a majority decided not — at this stage — to become an independent country. I accept that verdict of the people, and I call on all Scotland to follow suit in accepting the democratic verdict of the people of Scotland.”

But as FSRN’s Jacob Resneck reports, the independence movement did carry Scotland’s largest city – Glasgow.

At least 700 migrants and refugees killed in recent Mediterranean shipwrecks

This year is on course to become the deadliest in recent memory for undocumented migrants and refugees trying to reach Europe by crossing the Mediterranean from North Africa. International migrant advocacy groups believe at least 700 people have drowned in shipwrecks so far this month — in one recent case, there may have been as many as 500 passengers on board a single vessel when it sank. That’s according to UN estimates based on survivor testimonies. FSRN’s Shannon Young has more.

Civil rights groups urge congressional action on racial profiling

For the second week in a row, protesters made their voices heard at the St. Louis City Council Tuesday night. Angry about what they see as inaction in the police shooting death of Michael Brown, many reiterated demands that officials remove the St. Louis County prosecutor from the case, and arrest the officer who fatally shot the unarmed black teenager. Residents lined up to address the Council, and audience members interjected with action calls and protest chants. During public comment, speakers assured Council members that they would exercise their right to vote in coming elections.

Earlier the same day in Washington, D.C., civil rights groups gathered on Capitol Hill to urge Congress to take up a measure that aims to end racial profiling by law enforcement. Advocates say the events that took place in Ferguson, Missouri this summer highlight a need for comprehensive law enforcement reform. Ashley Westerman reports from Washington, D.C.

Pennsylvania parents call for buffers zones between fracking facilities and schools

On the front lines of the anti-fracking movement in western Pennsylvania, a group called Protect Our Children is calling for a one mile buffer between schools and natural gas infrastructure like gas wells, compressor stations and processing plants that proliferate all around them. And two studies just released draw opposite conclusions about the safety of living near the industry. Melinda Tuhus reports from Butler County, Pennsylvania.

Thai media under pressure since May military coup

Thai media outlets have been operating under pressure since the military took power in a May coup. While there have been some concessions by the junta, the outlook is uncertain even as a military-backed government moves on national reform and debate. Ron Corben reports from Bangkok.

Forty years after Chile coup, families of two U.S. citizens killed in aftermath await answers

Fourty-one years ago this weekend, two US citizens, Charles Horman and Frank Teruggi (NOTE: G is hard like “gee whiz”) were arrested in Santiago by Chilean security forces in the days following a bloody coup. Both were killed, and now four decades later a quest to understand how and why may be coming to closes. FSRN’s Norman Stockwell files this report.

 


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